Clinical Case 119: Trauma & the Sensitive New Age Ultrasound

OK tonight I have a trauma case for you.

Billifred is a 24 year old man whom lives with his partner.  There relationship took a turn for the worse this evening when she found her sister’s underpants in his car.

Billifred is a “lover, no a fighter…” but tonight he was forced to defend himself against a series of stabbings.  He is brought in by taxi with multiple bleeding wounds.

Editorial note:   Presentation by taxi carries a significantly increased risk of serious badness in my world.  Ambulance services are essentially free, so they often get used as a public transport service.  However, if you are sick / worried enough to fork out $20 for a cab fare – there is a good chance that you are actually pretty sick.  Auto triage is a real thing IMHO.

On arrival he is bleeding from cuts to both hands and his ulnar forearms.  He has blood on his leg from wounds on his lateral calf.  There is a small spot of blood on his left shirt pocket.  He is not really very cooperative.  When asked what happened he says he “fell whilst sharpening his hunting knife…”

Obs:  HR 120/min,   RR 28/min,  SpO2 on RA = 90% but up to 98% on 6L/min HM,  BP140/100.  He looks sweaty and anxious.

After stripping off his shirt you see a 1 cm stab wound just below the clavicle on the (L) anterior chest, midclavicular line…

So – control the bleeders – he gets a tourniquet to his arm to stem the loss from the cuts there and then needs a chest US….  bugger, the O&G doc has taken the machine to labour ward.

After securing IV access x2 and giving him some analgesia the radiographer pops in and does a quick portable CXR.  It is a rough shot with him breathing fast, not really vertical and taking shallow breaths.

Whilst you are waiting for the films to be processed ( yes, we still use actual plastic films!!) the Bedside US machine reappears.  So you do a quick chest scan looking for pneumothorax or haemothorax on the left.

You scan from the clavicle down the anterior chest and…  no sliding.  A static pleural line with no sliding.  His right chest is normal with good sliding easily seen.  The heart looks good and there is no pericardial effusion.

Being a super-sleuth sonowarrior, you scan now across the chest laterally towards the bed looking for a lung point [contact point] – and at about the posterior axillary line you see this:   CLICK TO SEE US CLIP

Now – that is golden – a good sized pneumothorax with the whole anterior chest showing no sliding and a lung point around laterally.  The evidence suggests 100% specificity for US when a clear lung point is seen.

A quick look at the left lung base shows a small effusion ~ 1cm deep, looks like partially clotted blood with mixed echo texture .

Meanwhile the friendly radiographer has returned with the plain film and the verbal report is ” ALL Clear, no pneumothorax…”  Here is the CXR…

CXR norm

Alright then – we will pause the case at this point.

This is the “le moment decisif” the point in time where you need to decide what are you going to do next.

Do you:

(A)  Crack on a put in a chest tube

(B)  Sit on the patient, admit and observe.

(C)  Fly them to the closest CT scanner (1000 km away) for a CT chest.

We covered the pneumothorax / Airplane transfer debate a while back in Clinical Case 108.

(D) Something else / smarter??

 

You have about 20 minutes of suturing time to think about it as you close his lesser injuries.

You even decide to repeat the chest US after sewing up his limbs – and it looks the same – pneumothorax to the posterior axillary line with a small effusion – stable in size.

OK let me know how you will play this one.

Casey

Clinical Case 115: Pneumothorax puzzle

This case was interesting for a number of reasons.  It starts with a 50 year old lady whom has been assaulted.  She says she was kicked in the head and chest.  In ED she is looking sore but stable – and it was felt that she had enough mechanism to warrant a CT of her head and neck.  On the neck CT it was noted that she had some surgical emphysema on the lower slices – so she stayed in the tube for a chest scan too!  Here it is:

Pneumothorax = Tense CT!

 

Now – I know what you are all thinking…  that is a CT image that should never had been captured!  We have all heard the addage that you should always pick a tension clinically and never need to image it… but…  the honest truth is that we just are not that good at picking pneumothorax clinically.  As you know I am an ultraosund tragic – and I believe we can certainly pick em with a quick chest probe.  However, relying on clinical exam is just not, well, reliable.

In recent years one error that I have seen creeping into my practice is the tendency to “fast-track” trauma patients to imaging where appropriate without completing a fully thorough secondary survey.  There are a lot of reasons (? excuses) for this:

– trying to get the imaging done in office hours,

– trying to get patients out of collars ASAP,

– relying on second-hand info via handover which may be innaccurate….

– search satificing. Stopping at one major injury!

So my “lesson learned” here is to be systematic and make sure that you are imaging everything that needs imaging and that you have excluded the big “killers” before settling for a CT.

OK – back to the case.

A chest tube was placed and the pneumothorax decompressed.  Post ICC films showed a well expanded lung.  Our patient was admitted to the ward.  Lets jump to the next day…..

Our patient starts to deteriorate.  She is becoming more hypoxic with tachypnoea.  What is going on?

Well there is a few possibilities.  The chief concern was that the tube was occluded / dislodged resulting in reaccumulation of the Ptx.  So another CXR was performed…

Take a few minutes to look at this CXR.  It was reported by the Radiologist as “recurrence of pneumothorax on the right, with overlying subcutaneous emphysema mimicking lung markings.”

There is no recurrence of the pneumothorax. Clinically: the ICC is “swinging” but not “bubbling” – so the tube is patent and CXR shows it is still intrapleural. There is of course considerable mediastinal shift – which is due to the loss of volume on the left side which is collapsed.

Of course – Ultrasound will be useful. The left side is going to be tricky as there is a heap of SubQ emphysema – so the pleura will be hard to visualise. However, if you can find a gap you can see sliding, great. Really the utility of US is to define the collapse on the left side – consolidation, is there an effusion?

So here is where it gets easy – back to basics. The problem here on ultrasound was consolidation with likely atelectasis. The nurses noted the patient was too sore from rib fractures and had been positioning herself right-side up with some haemoptysis. It was very likely that she had plugged some largish bronchi with blood and debris. So we engaged a trusty expert chest Physio to bang out some mucus and blood. Provided good analgesia and got her up and walking. The next day – here lung was re-expanded and her hypoxia was resolved

OK –  let’s hear your comments.  I you were at #SMACCUS last week then you will have a distinct advantage over the other readers as this case was put up in a session there and discussed.

There are so many potential errors that we can make in even the simplest of cases.  Trauma is a complex scenario with information overload, serious sequelae and time critical decisions to be made. So over the next few months I am hoping got run with a theme of “common errors and their mitigation”.  Hoping to have a few special guests on to help show how we can avoid the pitfalls and do better on the floor.

Casey

SMACCUS : Feeling the FOAM love

Writing this post from O’Hare Airport on my way back to Broome after SMACCUS.  40 hours in an aluminium tube….  [Kevin Fong has re-analysed the safety of air travel, so I’m feeling relatively safe… a bus would be safer!]

Looking back on the conference of the year.  There were some great moments, some spectacular ideas shared and plenty of education.  However, the best aspect of SMACC is the amazing connectedness and camaraderie that I feel at the tea breaks and social functions.  Sure, we all introduce ourselves by our Twitter handles! For the newcomers it seems a bit strange at first, but that moment of recognition when you can connect a smiling face to the years of digital dialogue you have shared is priceless.

On Day 1 I was due to give a talk after lunch.  As always I was a bit nervous.  I had planned a bit of an impromptu experiment in public speaking, and was a little concerned that it may flop!  Sometime in the morning I dropped my credit card in the hallway.  Man, another stress I did not need on the day!  But the awesome thing about SMACC is that a complete stranger, somebody whom I had never met online sent me a Tweet and handed it back within 20 minutes!  That is cool.  At what other conference or mass gathering would that happen?  I was feeling the FOAM Love!  And I knew that my little social experiment in evangelical Karaoke was going to work!  Everyone at this conference wants to be here, to connect, to share and get involved in the FOAM movement.

Sometimes I hear criticism of the SMACC / FOAM movement – people liken it to a cult of celebrity.  Is this true?  I don’t think so.  If anyone at the conference spent a moment chatting to the luminaries like Scott Weingart, Simon Carley, John Hinds, Chris Nickson, Vic Brazil or the other leaders – they would quickly realise that these people have tiny egos and do what they do because they want to improve healthcare.  They want the rest of us to walk out inspired, educated and challenged – to go back home and deliver the best care that is possible.

SMACC was particularly special for me this year.  I was able to meet a heap of the North American FOAMites that I have spent years working “alongside” and admiring.  On day 2 I watched the awesome spectacle that my Ultrasound buddies put together – SONOWARS.  At the end of the session James Rippey asked me to come up on stage.  James is my Ultrasound mentor – a true master under whom I have apprenticed in this crazy electronic age.  Although it did feel a bit indulgent to share this special moment in front of the crowd – I am glad we did.  For this is what FOAM is all about – finding your master, teacher or mentor.  And becoming a teacher to the next generation of brilliant young minds.

And then there was the song…

I wrote these lyrics for my lecture: “No Xray, No Problem!”  It was a talk about how we can use Ultrasound to be better doctors.  But it seems to have served as a sort of anthem for the FOAM LOVE which we all feel.  So here it is [Thanks to  @GruntDoc for the video].  Please share it with your colleagues.  See you in Dublin.   Casey

Imagine there’s no X-ray from GruntDoc on Vimeo.

Awesome Ultrasound Learning

Hi All

This is a quick post to let you know about a few great Ultrasound resources that are out there.

Sure everyone knows about the Ultrasound Podcast – unless you are a subpetrous life form!

But – there are a number of really nice, lesser known, well made educational Ultrasound sites out there.  So here are a few of my favourites:

  • SONOSPOT : a really nice blog written by Dr Laleh Gharahbaghian and friends.  There are cases, educational videos and a lot of literature reviews.  She also has a really extensive blogroll on her site – with links to heaps of other ultrasound resources.
  • 5 Minute Sono: From the “southern Gentry” of ultrasound – Drs Jacob Avila and Ben Smith have put together a really slick site with, as you might expect, 5-minute videos of all the common US applications.  Really well done with excellent images and narration. Note to my JMOs – you need to watch all of these videos soon!
  • Highland Ultrasound: a blog with a range of videos – largely aimed at ED and regional nerve blocks.  Written by Dr Arun Nagdev and friends out of Highland Hospital in Oakland, California.
  • Emergency Ultrasound Teaching: another American ED US site – lots of short instructional videos and cases – similar to some others – but spaced repetition is key to learning the art of Ultrasound!
  • The mega-blog Academic Life in EM has a section devoted to Ultrasound – there are great literature reviews of the evidence and cool “US for the Win” cases.  Part of the big ALIEM machine – well done and peer reviewed for high quality.
  • The Sono Cave and US Village are sites run by my own mentors and local west Aussie mates Dr James Rippey and Adrian Goudie & co.  Educational lectures, cases and my favourite are the “report cards” which you can print out for reference or laminate and put on your machine.
  • Ultrasound of the Week – also by Dr Ben Smith. A weekly case study with US to test your sono-skillz and see how the pros do it!  Narrative is key to my learning – so I love the cases and frequency is perfect!
  • Dr Chris Fox is a legendary US teacher out of UC Irvine.  He has put a whole heap of free video lectures up on iTunes  – well worth watching on various topics.  Has a great way of explaining the phenomena you will see and how to apply it in practice.

OK.  So that is the big, tip of the US Educational iceberg – there are so many other great sites out there.

Please let me know on the comments about your site, or a site that you find really useful.  Always on the hunt for some new material and perspectives.

P.S:

If you happen to be a Broome JMO or plan to come to Broome in the future – then check out as many of these as you can.  Having a good grip on the theory and how to apply it is great before you hit the ground and start trying to make decisions.  And that stuff is best taught by experts – doctors whom are masters of the craft.  Then we will play with the probes and our patients will prosper!

Casey

Clinical Case 114: Skull and Crackedbones

This case is inspired by a recent Twitter discussion with fellow Pads ED enthusiasts – Tessa Davis [ @TessaRDavis ] , Andrew Tagg [ @andrewjtagg ] , Rachael Rowlands [ @rachrwlnds ] and whoever else was reading.

As a background – you probably should read my previous ramblings about Paediatric head injury assessments here: Kids Coconuts and CTs

I think that the PECARN decision tool [MdCalc clickable version HERE ] is probably the most useful and robust data out there for making the call on children with minor head injuries in the ED.  In the past we have often taught or been taught to observe kids for hours and hours, or CT them.  The PECARN data set certainly has changed my practice in the last 5 years.

I now use it to identify children whom are at extremely low risk and feel confident to discharge them with follow-up instructions of course , one needs to be assured that the parents / carers are comfortable with this and able to access appropriate follow-up if required.  The PECARN study also gives us a basis for discussing the risks of observation, imaging and non-investigation in kids who are not in the low-risk group.

Now take a look at this part of the PECARN Algorithm – this is the section for kids aged under 2 years of age.

Screen Shot 2015-03-21 at 10.16.20 pm

The majority of kids that I see in this group are little ones who have walked / run / fallen head first into something solid.  They usually have a frontal “egg” or laceration over the forehead.

So lets walk through the algorithm.  If this kid has a large frontal haematoma then it is going to be tough to say that they do not have a skull fracture, or at least you may think you can feel something.  Let’s face it – pushing on a fresh, boggy swelling over a kids head is just plain cruel!

If you think that you can palpate a fracture – then they immediatley jump into the ‘high risk’ group i.e. the group that is recommended to CT early.  This was about 1 in 8 of the kids in this age group.

However, if there is no fracture palpable then you are very likely heading down the pathway to simple observation, or possibly into the super low-risk group.

Hence the question of the presence or absence of a skull fracture seems to be a big hinge-point when it comes to making this decision.  And here is what I suspect:  we are terrible at picking these!  OK, I understand that the PECARN trial is a pragmatic set-up.  It was a simple clinical call – was the clinician able to palpate a fracture.  However, in reality this does seem very subjective and prone to bias.

Enter our friend – the Ultrasound.  Is there nothing we cannot do with the probe?

Ultrasound is useful in picking fractures elsewhere in the body – particularly in superficial bones.  So can we detect skull fractures with any accuracy?

Well there are a few smallish trials looking gat this question in the literature:

One form New York, Jim Tsung and co. in Paediatrics, June 2013 – “Accuracy of Point-of-Care Ultrasound for Diagnosis of Skull Fractures in Children”

Another from Riera et al in Paediatric Emergency Care, May 2012 – “Ultrasound Evaluation of Skull Fractures in Children: A Feasibility Study”  This one had more small kids in it – i.e.. mean age 2 years

These are small trials – 115 patients combined.  19 had a fracture on CT – so the incidence was ~ 16%.  Like many POCUS papers they show the usual characteristics of bedside ultrasound techniques – very specific and reasonably sensitive – so if you see a fracture – there almost certainly is a fracture, but you will miss 15 – 20 % potentially based on the numbers here.  In the Tsung paper – only one fracture was missed – that was a fracture that was adjacent to the hematoma – rather than directly beneath it.  So you could improve this with a more thorough scan field.  In terms of likelihood ratios: bedside US give a +LR of 27 (excellent!) and a -LR of 0.13 (pretty good!).  As always – we need more data to validate this and make it more generally applicable.

So how would a bedside skull US fit into the PECARN pie?

Hard to say what our “Sensitivity and specificity” is for clinical palpation of skull fractures – I would guess we are 50% sensitive and 75% specific.

So using that as a comparison – we should be able rule in a few more kids who should probably get an early CT.

So will this mean we do more CTs?  I think not – as there are a lot of kids who have a nasty looking egg on the head – and we are often biased by the external picture into believing that we can feel a ‘step’ as we are worried and want to rule out badness.  So if we scan the kids with the ugly looking hematoma and find no fracture on US – then this would probably be a group where it is safe to push them into the “observe, wait ‘n see” strategy.  Although US is not super sensitive – it surely must be better than a subjective prod over a boggy lump.

[Note: if you use a stand-off pad or lots of gel – you can do this US without inflicting much pain at all.  No pressure needs to be applied.  So I think this is a more humane approach to the kids with a large, boggy swelling of the noggin.]

So overall I think that US would allow us to separate the goats from the sheep – allow us to create a bit of diagnostic daylight between these 2 groups:

(1) Those who definitely have a fracture and may need early imaging of the brain

(2) Those at lower risk of fracture who can be safely observed.

Bedside US probably doesn’t add too much to the kids whom can be classified as very low risk by the PECARN algorithm.

My practice is to promptly discharge kids who meet the “extremely low risk” criteria.  I give the parents reassurance and information for what to look out for.  But… this is my new pet peeve…  forcing a kid / family to sit in the ED for 4 – 6 hours to have “Neuro obs” completed seems like a really antisocial and low-yielding exercise in this group.  So if I am satisfied that the parents understand the risk and what to do if… happens, and there is no NAI question – I will send them home from triage.

Love to hear how you manage this common problem in your ED.

 

Casey